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SHEFFIELD:
Geographical and Historical information from the year 1868.

"SHEFFIELD, a parish, market town, municipal and parliamentary borough, and chief seat of the hardware manufacture, in the upper division of Strafforth wapentake, and the capital of the ancient liberty of Hallamshire, West Riding county York, 50 miles S.S.W. of York, and 162 N.W. of London by road, or 162½ by the Great Northern, and 175½ by the North-Western and Midland railways. Although not situated on the direct route of the great N. and S. railway lines, Sheffield is a considerable railway centre, communicating by a chain of small railways with the whole railway system of the kingdom. The Victoria station, belonging to the Great Northern and Manchester, Sheffield and Lincolnshire railways, is built with massive stone arches and piers, and covered with a roof of iron and glass. There is another large station in the Wicker, belonging to the Midland and London and North-Western railways, which also serves for the South Yorkshire line opened in 1855. The Sheffield, Rotherham, and Barnsley railway, with branch lines to the Silkstone collieries and Dodworth, has a station in the town. A branch canal, 4 miles long, was cut in 1819, communicating with the Don, or Dun, at Tinsley, thus affording direct water communication with the river system of the Trent and Humber, and so with the seaports of Goole, Hull, and Great Grimsby. The prosperity of the town, which now ranks second for wealth and population in Yorkshire, is in a great measure dependent on its geographical position, being seated in the midst of a district abounding in iron-ore, stone, and coal, and supplied with water power by several mountain streams which here join the Don. On all sides, with the exception of towards Doncaster, Sheffield is encompassed by an amphitheatre of hills, forming part of that extensive range of summits which stretches across the centre of the island, from Staffordshire to Westmoreland. From the eastern foot of these hills to the borders of Derbyshire stretches the parish of Sheffield, including the six townships of Nether Hallam, Upper Hallam, Ecclesall Bierlow, Sheffield, Brightside Bierlow, and Attercliffe-cum-Darnal, with the curacies of Dyer's Hill, Eldon, Fulwood, Heeley, Holliscroft, Moorfields, Pitsmoor, and Wicker, and about 60 other villages and hamlets The physical configuration of this district differs in various parts, but that portion on which the town of Sheffield stands is a sheltered valley overhung by the wooded heights of Wincobank, and watered by the streams of the Sheaf, from which the town takes its name, the Porter, and two other rivers, which all unite their waters at this point with the Don, on which much labour and expense has been bestowed to render it navigable. Although the present town is comparatively of recent growth, it probably originated from the Roman station at Templebro' about 3 miles distant on the bank of the Don, supposed to be the Ad Fines of the Iter of Richard of Cirencester, and traces of a Roman road, still called the Roman Rig, lead from the camp at Wincobank. Some antiquaries have suggested that the iron mines in this neighbourhood were worked by the Romans, and afterwards by the Saxons, but no such workings have as yet been identified, though many beds of ancient scoria are scattered over the surface. At the time of the Domesday Survey, the manor was held by Roger de Busli, under the Countess Judith, niece of William the Conqueror, and widow of Waltheof, Earl of Northumberland. It subsequently passed, through the marriage of the Countess Judith, to the family of St. Liz, Earls of Northampton, and afterwards to the Lovetots and Furnivals, who built the castle, and a bridge over the Don, and founded a hospital on the site still known as Spital Hill. In 1296 Edward I. granted to Thomas, Lord Furnival, a charter to hold a weekly market and an annual fair, and in the following year the town was made a free borough, with exemption from toll throughout Hallamshire. From the Furnivals, the castle and lordship passed by marriage to the Neville, and from them to the Talbots, Earls of Shrewsbury, one of whom, George, the fourth earl, in the reign of Henry VIII., built the manor house in the park, where Cardinal Wolsey was imprisoned in 1630, before his death at Leicester. In 1554, Francis, fifth Earl of Shrewsbury, obtained from Queen Mary a charter creating the "church burgesses" a body corporate, with a common seal, and power to provide for the repair of the church and relief of the poor. In the reign of Elizabeth, Sheffield Castle was the place of imprisonment of Mary Queen of Scots from 1570 to 1584, and about the same period the town greatly increased in prosperity from the influx of skilled artisans from the Netherlands, who, having fled from the persecutions of the Duke of Alva, were settled by the Earl of Shrewsbury, then the queen's chamberlain, on his own estate of Sheffield, in order to develop the manufacture of cutlery, which had been introduced previous to the reign of Edward III., as we learn from Chaucer, who speaks of the "Sheffield whittles." In the reign of James I. the Sheffield estates passed by the marriage of the Lady Alethea Talbot, granddaughter of the abovementioned earl, to Thomas Howard, Earl of Arundel, whose descendants, the dukes of Norfolk, still retain possession of the lordship. In the same reign an Act of incorporation was obtained by the cutlers of Sheffield, entitled, "An Act for the good order and government of the makers of knives, sickles, shears, scissors, and other cutlery wares in Hallamshire and parts near adjoining." At the commencement of the Civil War the house of Howard garrisoned the castle for the king, but it was speedily obliged to surrender to Sir John Gell, who held it for the parliament till the advance of the Duke of Newcastle, at the head of the royal army, compelled the parliamentarians to retire to Derbyshire. The town and castle were then committed to the charge of Sir William Saville, who caused cannon to be cast in the neighbouring iron factories for the defence of his entrenchments; and the royalists continued to hold it till after the battle of Marston Moor on 2nd July, 1644, when Major-General Crawford forced it to capitulate on 10th August, 1644. In 1648 it was dismantled by order of parliament, and no vestiges of this once famous stronghold now exist, except in the names of Castle-hill, Castlegreen, and Castle-fold. The manor house continued to be the occasional residence of its noble owner till 1706, when Thomas Duke of Norfolk ordered it to be dismantled, and the park broken up into farms. In the beginning of the 18th century the trade of the district had made so much progress that the number of persons engaged in it was estimated at 6,000, and the yearly value of the goods above £100,000. It was, however, about fifty years later, when Sheffield became the mart of Hancock's plated goods, that the great development of trade took place. At this period mail coaches were started for London, and merchants for the first time opened direct communication with the Continent. The refining of the precious metals and the manufacture of silver plate were next introduced, and an assay office opened in the town, at which as much as 6,000 lbs. weight of silver are said to have been hall-marked in one year. The greatest discovery of all was, however, the composition called "Britannia metal," which speedily superseded pewter, and gave to the town a new staple manufacture. The lead works on the Porter were likewise established, and silk and cotton mills set up, but these last did not flourish. During the present century the employment of steam in the grinding of cutlery, the invention of a new hard white metal, called "German silver," and the application of the process of electroplating, have raised Sheffield to the first rank amongst manufacturing towns. At the great international Exhibition of 1851, the manufacturers of this town carried off 60 council or prize medals, and in the subsequent Exhibitions of Paris, in 1856, and of London, in 1862, they fully maintained their pre-eminence. In addition to the staple trades before mentioned, various other branches of manufacture are successfully carried on, especially in iron and steel, as edge tools of every description, agricultural implements, files, hafts and scales, razors, saws, scissors, anvils, awl blades, chains, clasps, portable forges, stoves, grates, fenders, fire-irons, steam boilers, engines, railway carriage tires, axles, wheels, buffers, springs, powder flasks, saw handles, magnets, nails, needles, steel pens, rivets, articles in glass, brass, ivory, bone, horn, and pearl; Sheffield also contains numerous chasers, die sinkers, engravers, type founders, gold and silver smiths, jewellers, opticians, turners, moulders, and coal miners and quarries. Some of the longest-established and most eminent firms are the Atlas steel and ironworks, Saunderson's and Greaves's steel works, Rodgers's cutlery, Mariott's file factory, the River Don works, the Sheaf and Spring works, the Cyclops works, Park works, Regent works, Wilkinson's plate warehouses; besides a great variety of foundries, warehouses, mills, and other works. There are also many mercantile houses, some of which confine their commercial operations to the home markets, while others export largely to the United States, Australia, the Cape of Good Hope, Brazil, South America, and the several continental cities, in most of which the manufactures of Sheffield are to be found. The ordinary wages of the artisans in Sheffield are liberal, ranging from £1 to £2 a week, and in consequence their social condition is superior, most families living in separate tenements. In March, 1864, a catastrophe occurred by the bursting of the Bradfield dam, or embankment, which pent up the waters between the hills of Stannington and Loxley, about 6 miles N.W. of Sheffield, thus forming a reservoir, or rather artificial lake, 1¼ mile in length, by a quarter of a mile broad, with a depth varying from 60 to 70 feet in its centre, and about 40 feet throughout. This mass of waters having thrown down the embankment, swept down the valley towards the lower part of Sheffield, carrying everything before it, mills, factories, trees, and entire streets of houses, and drowning between 200 and 300 people. The places which suffered most were Hillsborough, Malin-bridge, and along the Owlerton road. Although a prosperous town, Sheffield does not present to the stranger an opulent appearance, from the absence of spacious squares and streets, most of the merchants and manufacturers having their private residences in the suburbs, which are extensive. The older part of the town is situated within the angle formed by the rivers Don and Sheaf, which are spanned by several bridges, and consists of numerous small streets, which, with the exception of one or two principal thoroughfares, are narrow and inconvenient. The houses are chiefly of brick. The streets are all well paved and lighted with gas. The public buildings are numerous; the townhall, in Castle-street, was built in 1808, and enlarged in 1833, at the expense of the town trust; the council hall, in Norfolk-street, where the corporation hold their meetings, is a modern structure; the cutlers' hall, in Church-street, is a Grecian structure, with massive Corinthian columns, erected in 1833 for the accommodation, and at the expense, of the Cutlers' Company, originally established by Act of Parliament in 1624, and exercising the exclusive right of granting trade marks; the county-court hall, in Bank-street, built in 1855; the corn exchange, erected in 1830 at the cost of the Duke of Norfolk; the new market hall, or Norfolk market, built on the site of the Tontine Inn, is a commodious pile of buildings in the Tuscan style, also erected by the Duke of Norfolk in 1851, at a cost of near £40,000. It is of brick, with stone basement, and measures 296 feet by 115, with a roof of iron and glass, and a fountain in the centre. The exchange and newsrooms occupy a building facing the old market. The facade consists of a centre and two receding wings; the former with Doric pilasters and entablature proper. The lower part is occupied by the fish and fruit markets and the old-established wine-vaults of Young and Co., and the first floor by the exchange and newsrooms, established in 1856. Over the market entrances are two niches with carved figures, of Mercury and Vulcan, the former typical of the Telegraph Company's offices, which occupy the King-street end of the building, and the latter of the staple trade of Sheffield. The savings-bank in Norfolk-street is in the Italian style, erected in 1860; the Temperance Company's Hall, in Townhead-street. The barracks, completed in 1854, for cavalry and infantry, are in the Tudor style, and occupy a site of 25 acres, with entrances from the Langsett and Peniston roads. The assay office, the vestry hall, built in 1857, and situated in the cemetery road, the music-hall, in Surrey-street, erected in 1823; the fire office in George-street, erected in 1810. There are besides the mechanics' institute, the Athenæum, in George-street, the law library, the Sheffield club, the inland revenue and tax office, the public baths in the Glossop-road, with two large swimming baths, two tepid plunge baths, and a concert-room, the royal theatre, built in 1773 and enlarged and redecorated in 1855; the Adelphi theatre, built in 1837; the free public library, in Surrey-street, established by the town council in 1855, and supported by a rate of a halfpenny in the pound; the Sheffield library, with 30,000 volumes; the literary and philosophical society, with a valuable museum, also at the music-hall; the gasworks, which were originally constructed by three several companies, amalgamated by Act of Parliament are situate at Sheaf Bridge, Shude Hill, Effingham-street, and Neepsend. The water works are situated on Crookesmoor, and the reservoirs at Redmires, 6 miles W. of the town. There are three extramural cemeteries, the general cemetery, comprising about 14 acres, situated in the vale of the Porter, was formed in 1836, and is approached by the Ecclesall and cemetery roads; the Brightside Bierlow cemetery, situated on the N. side of the town, comprises about 26 acres, and was opened in 1860; and St. Philips' cemetery, comprising about 6 acres on a sloping bank near the base of Old Park Wood. The botanical gardens, comprising about 18 acres, were laid out in 1836 by Robert Marnock, the landscape gardener, who afterwards designed the Royal botanical gardens in Regent's Park. There are three newspapers published in the town, viz: the Daily Telegraph, the Sheffield and Rotherham Independent, and the Sheffield Times-the two first are daily papers, and the last is published weekly on Saturday. There is a statue to Ebenezer Elliott, who long resided in the town. James Montgomery died here in 1854. Chantrey, the sculptor, was born in the neighbouring village of Norton, and in the parish of Sheffield is the first bust executed by him. At Loxley Wood, in the vicinity, Robin Hood is said to have been born. From this point a view of the town is obtained, as also from Sky Edge, the Crookes, Derbyshire Lane, Wharncliffe Crags, and Cholera Mount, which last place took its name from having been the burial place of 339 persons who died from cholera in 1832. The cutlers keep two or three subscription packs of harriers. The limits of the municipal and parliamentary boroughs, comprise the town, with the whole parish of Sheffield, and in 1851 contained 27,099 houses, inhabited by a population of 135,310, which in 1861 had increased to 38,052 houses, with a population of 185,172. It has returned two members to parliament since the passing of the Reform Act, by which it was enfranchised, and is a polling-place for the county elections of the West Riding. Its first charter of incorporation as a municipal borough was granted in August, 1843, under which it is divided into nine wards or districts, and is governed by a mayor, 13 aldermen, and 42 town councillors, with the style of "mayor, aldermen, and burgesses of the borough of Sheffield." The corporation revenue is about £7,000. The corporation hold their meeting at the Council-hall in Norfolk-street. The October quarter sessions are held at the townhall; and petty sessions for the borough, before the mayor and bench of magistrates, daily at twelve o'clock, also petty sessions for the West Riding district, beyond the boundaries of the borough, twice a week. It is the seat of a new County Court, insolvent debtors' court, court of bankruptcy in the northern circuit, also of an excise district, and of a superintendent registry district. It is divided into two Poor-law Unions, the Sheffield union comprising the four townships of Attercliffe-cum-Darnall, Brightside, Bierlow, Handsworth and Sheffield; and that of Ecclesall Bierlow comprising the remaining townships of Ecclesall, Nether Hallam, and Upper Hallam, besides four others situated in Derbyshire. The parish is divided into 25 ecclesiastical districts, some of which are new parishes under a late Act of Parliament. Nearly the whole of the land on which the town is built was the property of the Dukes of Norfolk, till 1802, when an Act of Parliament was passed enabling them to alienate certain portions of their Sheffield. estates. Under this Act considerable portions of the town have subsequently passed into the hands of freeholders. Most of the cutlers are men of small capital, and many building societies have been formed to enable the more provident artizans to become possessors of their own tenements. The living is a vicarage* in the diocese of York, value £500, besides an endowment for three assistant ministers. The parish church, situated near the centre of the town, is a cruciform structure, with Norman traces, founded in the reign of Henry I., but nearly rebuilt in the reign of Henry VIII. It is 240 feet long by 130 feet broad, and has a lofty spired tower arising from the centre and containing a peal of ten bells, a set of chimes, and an illuminated clock. In the interior are several monuments of the Talbots, Earls of Shrewsbury, of Elizabeth, Countess of Lennox, sister-in-law to Mary Queen of Scots, and of Walker, the supposed executioner of Charles I.; also several pieces of sculpture by Chantrey and others. The parochial register dates from 1560. In addition to the parish church are the following district churches, viz: St. Paul, St. James, St. George, St. Philip, St. Mary, St. John the Evangelist, St. Thomas Crookes, Holy Trinity Wicker, St. Stephen's, Attercliffe, Brightside, St. Matthew's, Darnall, Dyer's Hill, Ecclesall Bierlow, St. Jude, Eldon-street, Fulwood Heely, Hollis Croft, St. Jude's, Moorfields, and Pitsmoor; the livings of which are all perpetual curacies, varying in value from £400 to £100. Of these twelve are situated within the town, and the others in the rural districts. St. George's, built by the Parliamentary Commissioners in 1825, at a cost of above £14,800, has a western tower 139 feet high, and is situated in St. George's-square. It has an altar-piece by Paris, representing Christ blessing little children. St. Philip's (in the Peniston-road) was erected in 1833 at a cost of £11,874. St. Stephen's, in Bramall-lane, was built and endowed at the sole expense of a munificent townsman, Henry Wilson, Esq., of Westbrook. This church, situated at the junction of Belfield and Fawcett streets, was erected in 1857 at a cost of about £4,500. The district church at the village of Attercliffe, called Christ Church, was erected in 1822, at a cost of over £14,000. The Roman Catholics have two churches St. Mary's, in Norfolk-row, was completed in 1850 at a cost of £8,000, and has a tower surmounted by a spire, and containing a peal of eight cast-steel bells; and St. Vincent's, at White Croft, was erected in 1856, at a cost of £3,800. The Catholic Apostolic church in Victoria-street was finished in 1851. The Presbyterian church is in Hanover-street. The other places of worship belonging to the various Dissenting communions are more than 30 in number, comprising many spacious structures; the Independents and Wesleyans have each six chapels, the Baptists and New Connexion Methodists three each, the Association Methodists two, the Primitive Methodists and Wesleyan Reformers several, and the Unitarians, Society of Friends, and Plymouth Brethren, each one; the Jews also have two synagogues, and the Mormonites several meeting rooms. There are two public bodies intrusted with endowments applicable to the benefit and general improvement of the town, viz: the Town Trustees and the Church-Burgesses; the former hold their property under a charter granted in 1297 by Thomas, third Lord Furnival, and the latter by a charter of Queen Mary in 1554, by which their body was incorporated. The funds of the latter body having greatly augmented, their application was regulated by an order in Chancery obtained in 1854. The local charities besides are numerous, including the general infirmary, on 31 acres, erected in 1794, at a cost of £20,000, and enlarged in 1841, mainly supported by public subscription; the public hospital and dispensary in West-street, erected in 1835, and enlarged in 1858, containing 51 beds; the Deakin institution, for the advancement of single women of good character, originated in 1849; the Hanbey and Hadfield charities; the blind-school in West-street, founded in 1860 for the instruction of the blind in mat and basket making and other useful occupations; the Shrewsbury or Norfolk hospital founded in 1616 with an income from endowment of £2,000; Hollis's hospital for cutlers' widows, with an income of £680; the licensed victuallers' asylum, erected in 1848, at Grimesthorpe, the union poorhouse, a large stone structure in the Elizabethan style situate at Cherrytree Hill, and workhouses at Brightside, Ecclesall, and Nether Hallam, besides various provident and benevolent institutions. In Surrey-street is a medical school in connection with the University of London, the students studying at the hospital and infirmary. The free grammar-school, founded by Thomas Smith in 1603, has an income from endowment of £200, and now occupies a building in Charlotte-street, erected in 1842 by subscription. It is under the care of a head and three other masters, and has about 80 scholars, of whom half are on the foundation. Wesley College is a proprietary grammar-school now affiliated to the London University, and empowered to issue certificates to candidates for degrees. It occupies a site of six acres in the Glossop-road, and was built by subscription in 1839 at a cost of £15,000. It is under the direction of a governor, who is also chaplain, a head and second master, and thirteen other teachers, and has accommodation for 250 boarders. The Collegiate Proprietary school was founded in 1835 by a body of proprietors, and is under the direction of a principal and eight other masters. It has an annual scholarship of £25 per annum, tenable for three years at Oxford or Cambridge, and is attended by 100 scholars. The school of design, founded in 1841, now occupies a building erected in 1857 at a cost of above £7,000. It is partly supported by a government grant, and has been found beneficial in the development of art-manufactures, being attended by above 200 pupils. The people's college in Orchard-street is an educational institution chiefly for the working classes. There are besides several National, British and Foreign, Infant, Industrial, Denominational, Lancastrian, Ragged, and Sunday schools in connection with the several district churches and other places of worship. Sheffield gives title of earl and baron to the Holroyds of Sheffield park, near Lewes, in Sussex, but who take their title from this place. Market days are Tuesday and Saturday. Fairs are held on the Tuesday and Wednesday in Whitsun week, and on the 28th of November for the sale of cattle, horses, cheese, &c."


"ABBEY DALE, a hamlet in the township of Ecclesall-Bierlow, borough and parish of Sheffield, in the West Riding of the county of York, 3 miles from Sheffield."


"ATTERCLIFFE CUM DARNAL, a chapelry in the parish of Sheffield, southern division of the wapentake of Strafforth and Tickhill, in the West Riding of the county of York, 2 miles to the N.E. of Sheffield. It is situated on the river Don, and takes its name from a lofty cliff near the village overhanging the river. The Sheffield and Tinsey canal and the Rotherham railway, a single line constructed in 1847, pass through the chapelry It contains the hamlet of Carbrook. The population are engaged in the manufacture of cutlery and other branches of the Sheffield trade. It was at Attercliffe that the first specimens of cast steel were produced. The beautiful variety of coal called Cannel is obtained in this district. The living is a perpetual curacy in the diocese of York, value £180, in the patronage of the Vicar of Sheffield. There is an alms house, an endowed Sunday school, and several other charities. The principal residence is Attercliffe Hall. The manor is held by the Duke of Norfolk."


"BANNER CROSS, a hamlet in the township of Ecclesall-Bierlow, and parish of Sheffield, southern division of the wapentake of Strafforth and Tickhill, in the West Riding of the county of York, 3 miles to the S.W. of Sheffield. The principal residence is the seat of the Rev. W. Bagshawe, a modern mansion in the perpendicular style of architecture."


"BARBER NOOK, a hamlet in the township of Ecclesall-Bierlow, and parish of Sheffield, in the wapentake of Strafforth and Tickhill, in the West Riding of the county of York, 4 miles from Sheffield. It lies on the confines of Derbyshire."


"BENT'S GREEN, a hamlet in the township of Ecclesall-Bierlow, and parish of Sheffield, in the wapentake of Strafforth and Tickhill, in the West Riding of the county of York, 2 miles to the S.W. of Sheffield."


"BRIDGEHOUSES, a village in the borough and parish of Sheffield, in the West Riding of the county of York, in the suburbs of Sheffield."


"BRIGHTSIDE BIERLOW, a township in the borough and parish of Sheffield, wapentake of Strafforth and Tickhill, in the West Riding of the county of York, 3 miles to the N.E. of Sheffield. Here is a station on the Sheffield and Rotherham branch of the Midland railway. The township is situated on the banks of the Don, and comprises the hamlets of Brightside, Grimesthorpe, and some others. It is the seat of extensive iron-works, and many hands are employed in the cutlery manufacture. The living is a perpetual curacy in the diocese of York, of the value of £130, in the patronage of the crown and the bishop alternately. There is an endowed free school at Grimesthorpe, with an income of about £15 a year. New Hall is one of the principal seats."


"BRINCLIFFE EDGE, a hamlet in the township of Ecclesall-Bierlow, in the borough and parish of Sheffield, West Riding of the county of York, 4 miles to the S.W. of Sheffield."


"BROAD OAKGREEN, a hamlet in the township of Ecclesall-Bierlow, borough and parish of Sheffield, in the West Riding of the county of York, 3 miles from Sheffield."


"BROOMHALL, a hamlet in the township of Ecclesall-Bierlow, parish of Sheffield, and wapentake of Strafforth and Tickhill, in the West Riding of the county of York, 3 miles to the S.W. of Sheffield."


"BUTTON HILL, a hamlet in the township of Ecclesall-Bierlow, borough and parish of Sheffield, in the wapentake of Strafforth and Tickhill, West Riding of the county of York, 4 miles to the S.W. of Sheffield."


"CARBROOK, a hamlet in the chapelry of Attercliffe-cum-Darnal, in the borough and parish of Sheffield, wapentake of Strafforth and Tickhill, in the West Riding of the county of York, 2 miles to the N.E. of Sheffield."


"CARSICK HILL, a hamlet in the township of Upper Hallam, in the borough and parish of Sheffield, wapentake of Strafforth and Tickhill, in the West Riding of the county of York, 2 miles to the W. of Sheffield."


"CARTER KNOWL, a hamlet in the township of Ecclesall-Bierlow, borough and parish of Sheffield, in the wapentake of Strafforth and Tickhill, West Riding of the county of York, 5 miles to the S.W. of Sheffield."


"CHERRY TREE HILL, a hamlet in the parish of Sheffield, in the southern division of the wapentake of Strafforth, in the West Riding of the county of York, 4 miles S.W. of Sheffield."


"CRABTREE, a village in the township of Brightside-Bierlow and parish of Sheffield, in the West Riding of the county of York, 3½ miles N.E. of Sheffield. There are two other small places of this name: one in the county of Devon, near Plymouth, and the other in Middlesex, near Hammersmith."


"CROOKES, a hamlet in the township of Nether Hallam, and parish of Sheffield, in the West Riding of the county of York, 1½ mile N. of Sheffield."


"CROOKS, (and Crooks Moor) hamlets in the townships of Nether-Hallam and Ecclesall-Bierlow, parish of Sheffield, in the West Riding of the county of York, 3 miles S.W. of Sheffield."


"CROSSPOOL, a hamlet in the township of Upper Hallam, parish of Sheffield, in the West Riding of the county of York, 3 miles W. of Sheffield."


"DARNALL, a chapelry in the parish of Sheffield, in the West Riding of the county of York, 3 miles E. of Sheffield. It is joined to Attercliffe: The village is situated on the road from Sheffield to Worksop, and most of the inhabitants are engaged in the manufacture of cutlery, quarrying stone, or in the collieries. The living is a curacy in the diocese of York, value £150, in the patronage of trustees. The church, dedicated to the Holy Trinity, was erected in 1841, at the cost of £2,500. There are National schools, and almshouses for poor widows; built by S. Staniforth, Esq. Darnall Hall, built by the Staniforths, was afterwards a seat of the dukes of Norfolk."


"DOBBIN HILL, a hamlet in the township of Ecclesall-Bierlow and parish of Sheffield, in the West Riding of the county of York, 4 miles S.W. of Sheffield."


"ECCLESALL BIERLOW, a township in the parish of Sheffield, S. division of the wapentake of Strafforth, West Riding county York. It is situated on the S.W. of the town of Sheffield, of which it is a suburb, and is included in the parliamentary borough, but is a separate ecclesiastical district, and contains between twenty and thirty hamlets. The inhabitants are mostly employed in the numerous hardware and cutlery establishments and ironworks. It is the head of a Poor-law Union and of a superintendent registry, but belongs to Sheffield new County Court district. The living is a perpetual curacy* in the diocese of York, in the patronage of the Vicar of Sheffield. The church, a stone structure, occupying the site of one which belonged to Beauchief Abbey, is situated near Banner Cross, about 3 miles from Sheffield. There is a National school for both sexes, and one for infants. Ecclesall College, a fine stone edifice, was erected a few years back. There are several handsome residences, of which Holmwood and Banner Cross House are the principal. Earl Fitzwilliam is lord of the manor."


"ELM, a hamlet in the township of Ecclesfield and parish of Sheffield, West Riding county York, 4 miles N. of Sheffield."


"ENDCLIFFE, a village in the parish of Sheffield, West Riding county York, 2 miles W. of Sheffield."


"FULWOOD, a hamlet and ecclesiastical district in the township of Upper Hallam, parish of Sheffield, West Riding county York, 3 miles W. of Sheffield. The village is pleasantly situated in the vale of the river Porter. It contains several manufactories for cutlery and a forge for the conversion of iron into steel. Coal and sandstone are worked. The living is a perpetual curacy in the diocese of York. The church, called Christ Church, is a handsome modern structure, with a square embattled tower."


"GREYSTONES, a hamlet in the township of Ecclesall-Bierlow and parish of Sheffield, West Riding county York, 3 miles S.W. of Sheffield."


"GRIMESTHORPE, a village in the township of Brightside Bierlow and parish of Sheffield, West Riding county York, 3 miles N.E. of Sheffield."


"HALLAM GATE, a hamlet in the township of Ecclesall Bierlow, parish of Sheffield, West Riding county York, 2 miles from Sheffield."


"HIGH FIELD, a hamlet in the township of Ecclesall-Bierlow, borough and parish of Sheffield, West Riding county York, 4 miles S.W. of Sheffield. There are numerous seats and small places of this name in- almost every county of England, but not of sufficient importance to require separate notice."


"HILL BRIDGE, a village in the township of Nether-Hallam, and parish of Sheffield, wapentake of Strafforth, West Riding county York, 3 miles W. of Sheffield."


"HILL FOOT, a hamlet in the township of Nether Hallam, and parish of Sheffield, West Riding county York, 2 miles W. of Sheffield."


"HILL TOP, a hamlet in the parish of Sheffield, West Riding county York, 4 miles N.W. of Sheffield."


"LITTLE COMMON, a hamlet in the township of Ecclesall-Bierlow, parish of Sheffield, West Riding county York, 4 miles S.W. of Sheffield, within which borough it is included."


"LITTLE SHEFFIELD, a hamlet in the township of Ecclesall Bierlow and parish of Sheffield, West Riding county York, 4 miles S.W. of Sheffield."


"LYDGATE, a village in the township of Nether Hallam and parish of Sheffield, West Riding county York, 1 mile W. of Sheffield."


"MACHON BANK, a hamlet in the township of Ecclesall-Bierlow, parish of Sheffield, West Riding county York, 3 miles S.W. of Sheffield."


"MALIN BRIDGE, a hamlet in the township of Nether Hallam, parish of Sheffield, West Riding county York, 1½ milo W. of Sheffield."


"MILN HOUSES, a hamlet in the township of Ecclesall-Bierlow and parish of Sheffield, West Riding county York, 4 miles S.W. of Sheffield."


"NEEPSEND, a village in the township of Brightside-Bierlow, and the borough and parish of Sheffield, West Riding county York, 2 miles N.E. of Sheffield. It is situated near the river Don and the line of the North Midland railway. The inhabitants are chiefly engaged in the neighbouring ironworks, and in the cutlery manufacture."


"NETHER EDGE, (and Upper Edge) hamlets in the township of Ecclesall-Bierlow and parish of Sheffield, West Riding county York, 3 miles S.W. of Sheffield."


"NETHER GREEN, a hamlet in the township of Upper Hallam and parish of Sheffield, West Riding county York, 4 miles W. of Sheffield."


"NETHER HALLAM, a township in the parish of Sheffield, wapentake of Strafforth and Tickhill, West Riding county York, 2 miles W. of Sheffield. At the commencement of the present century it consisted of an extensive tract of wasteland and common, but an Act having been obtained in 1791 for its enclosure, it has been brought into cultivation, and is now a densely populated district, containing Newfield Green, Heeley, and numerous other hamlets. Many of the inhabitants are engaged in the iron and steel works."


"NEWFIELD GREEN, a village in the township of Nether Hallam and parish of Sheffield, West Riding county York, 2 miles W. of Sheffield."


"PHILADELPHIA, a village in the township of Nether Hallam, parish of Sheffield, West Riding county York, 2 miles W. of Sheffield."


"PITSMOOR, a hamlet in the parish of Sheffield, wapentake of Strafforth and Tickhill, West Riding county York, 1 mile from Sheffield, of which it is a suburb. The living is a perpetual curacy in the diocese of York, value £300, in the patronage of the crown and bishop alternately. The church is a modern structure."


"RANMOOR, a hamlet in the township of Upper Hallam, parish of Sheffield, West Riding county York, 3 miles S.W. of Sheffield."


"SANDY GATE, a hamlet in the township of Upper Hallam and parish of Sheffield, West Riding county York, 3 miles S.W. of Sheffield."


"SHARROW HEAD, (and Sharrow Moor and Sharrow Vale) hamlets in the township of Ecclesall Burlow, borough and parish of Sheffield, West Riding county York, 3 miles S.W. of Sheffield."


"SILVER HILL, a hamlet in the township of Ecclesall Bierlow and parish of Sheffield, West Riding county York."


"SOUTHEY, a village in the township of Ecclesfield and parish of Sheffield, West Riding, county York, 4 miles N. of Sheffield."


"SPRING VALE, a hamlet in the township of Nether Hallam and parish of Sheffield, West Riding county York, 1 mile W. of Sheffield."


"STEEL BANK, a hamlet in the township of Nether Hallam and parish of Sheffield, West Riding county York, 2 miles W. of Sheffield."


"STUMPERLEY, a hamlet in the township of Upper Hallam and parish of Sheffield, West Riding county York, 2 miles S.W. of Sheffield."


"TAPTON, a hamlet in the township of Nether Hallam and parish of Sheffield, West Riding county York, near Sheffield."


"UPPER HALLAM, a township in the parish of Sheffield, wapentake of Strafforth and Tickhill, West Riding county York, adjoining Nether Hallam. It is bounded on the N. by the river Rivelin, and on the S. by the Porter, and was until recently a wild district. It is now densely populated, containing above 20,000 inhabitants, distributed in several hamlets or villages, where the manufactures of iron and steel are extensively carried on, especially steel-wire drawing, spring-knives, files, and carpenters' tools. There are also collieries and quarries of stone for building. The principal hamlets are Fulwood, and Gool Green, 5 miles W. of Sheffield, Carrick Hill, 3½ W., Nether Green and Hangingwater, about 3 S.W., Ran Moor and Sandygate, 3 W., also Crosshack, Stephen Hill, Stumperlow, and Ringinglow. Of these, Fulwood is the most considerable, and was constituted an ecclesiastical district by order of council in January, 1849. The living is a perpetual curacy endowed by Miss Phoebe Silcock, who built the church in 1837 at the expense of £2,200. The church, called Christ Church, stands in the vale of the Porter, and has a square embattled tower 67 feet high. There are places of worship for the Independents and Wesleyans at Fulwood and the latter have also a chapel at Ran Moor. At Fulwood is an endowed school, built in 1793, with an income of about £20 per annum; also a school supported by the Independents."


"UPPER HEELEY, (and Nether Heeley) villages in the township of Nether Hallam and parish of Sheffield, West Riding county York, 1 mile S. of Sheffield."


"UPPERTHORPE, a hamlet in the township of Nether Hallam, parish of Sheffield, West Riding county York, 2 miles W. of Sheffield."


"WALKLEY, a hamlet in the township of Nether Hallam, parish of Sheffield, West Riding county York, 2 miles N.W. of Sheffield."


"WHIRLOW, a hamlet in the township of Ecclesall-Bierlow, parish of Sheffield, West Riding county York, 3 miles S.W. of Sheffield."


"WICKER, an ecclesiastical district in the borough and parish of Sheffield, wapentake of Strafforth, West Riding county York, adjoining Sheffield, Of which it is a suburb, containing, according to the census of 1861, 10,796 inhabitants."

[Transcribed from The National Gazetteer of Great Britain and Ireland 1868]
by Colin Hinson ©2003


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